Accident Insurance and What to Do When a Child Gets Hurt

By Aviva Yoselis
Our strict contributed content guidelines ensure useful, informative and non-solicitous submitted content. Opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own.


Active Children Get Hurt

kid scraped kneeThe other day, I realized that there are actually people living in Israel who’ve never been to the Emergency Room, who’ve never had to take a bleeding child to the extended hours clinic to be stitched up, who’ve never looked at the chip in their child’s tooth after a fall from a slide and said, ‘yep, that tooth is gonna have to be fixed’. Now, before you stop reading in horror and say, my goodness what a negligent mother, let me just inform you that I have active boys. Three of them. Really active. And active girls who play with the active boys. We’ve been stitched, glued, x-rayed, bandaged…

So here are some important facts to know if your child, grandchild, niece, nephew or little neighbor gets hurt:

Accident Insurance for School Aged Children

Teeth

If a school age child (pre-K through 12th grade) has any type of tooth injury, chipped, knocked out, cracked,…treatment is covered by the school insurance, even if it didn’t happen on school property or during school hours. This means, that yes, the eight year old girl who was chasing her brother around the house, tripped, and cracked her two newly grown front teeth in half, can get full reconstruction of those teeth for free.

To go about this, you need to call the national insurance company (not connected to your kupah): 1-800-44-33-44 [in Hebrew only], give them your child’s information and they will call you back with a number and a list of eligible dental clinics. With that number and a letter from the school secretary saying your child is a student, you can make an appointment and go to one of the approved clinics.

Accident Injury

The insurance that you purchase at the beginning of each school year (mandatory~75 NIS), covers your school age child for all kinds of accidents (except for car and terrorist events-that’s through Bituach Leumi). If your child is hurt falling out of a tree, falling off a bike, injured on the playground, even if it didn’t happen on school property or during school hours, your child is eligible for insurance coverage. If they have a temporary disability, they may also receive coverage for that. Contact the secretary of the school for relevant phone numbers of the insurance.

Things to Remember

Head/facial wounds bleed, a lot

If the child comes in from the outside with blood running down their cheek, take a deep breath and wash the wound off first. Sometimes even small cuts look massive in the beginning.

If the injury looks deep, take the child to the nearest extended hours clinic of your kupah (not the ER unless it’s after midnight). Make sure you know where this clinic is before there’s an accident, so you don’t have to call around in the moment of panic. Put the number and address up on your fridge so it’s accessible. If there is an injury around the eye, or the cut is especially deep, know that the extended hours clinic or Terem may end up sending you to the ER to be stitched; you still need to go to the kupah clinic first, and then go to the ER with a referral, in order for the ER fee to be covered by the kupah.

[Editor’s note: If the situation is truly urgent, and wasted time contributes to the danger, do not pause for preliminary concerns. Click here to read more about Medical Attention Any Time and in Emergencies.]

Possible concussions

If the child is unconscious or loses consciousness, feels dizzy or vomits after a falling injury, take the child to the ER immediately.


Aviva Yoselis, MPH, founder and director of Health Advize and Viva Research Institute, is an expert in the field of health research, health behavior modification and shared medical decision making. She has over 20 years of experience facilitating seminars and teaching classes on health behavior and health system navigation. Aviva is skilled in identifying key points in complex situations, and looking at a range of possible solutions. Feel free to download her free guide on navigating the Israel Health Care system at http://healthadvize.com/contact-us/.

Subsidized therapy for those coping with illness and loss

Tishkofet Ma’agan (Life’s Door) offers subsidized therapy for those coping with illness and loss. The basic subsidized rate is 180 NIS per session, but further subsidies are available and each client’s needs and means are assessed individually.

For more information, contact Margo: mhelman@tishkofet.co.il, 02-631-2635.

Tishkofet Therapy Program

Special Services Benefit (Attendance Allowance)

Information about the Special Services Benefit (Attendance Allowance) in English! 

A Special Services Benefit (Attendance Allowance) is paid to certain adults with medical disability who require significant assistance from another person in performing daily activities, or who need constant supervision to prevent them from posing a risk to their own lives or the lives of others.

Please note: The National Insurance Institute refers to the Special Services Benefit (a direct translation of the Hebrew קצבת שירותים מיוחדים) as an “Attendance Allowance”. 

As part of our on-going collaboration with Kol-Zchut, we are proud to have translated and published this easy-to-read, critical and unique resource of information that was not previously available in English. You can either view the guide below or click here to follow an external link. 

Related information:

 

Not familiar with The Shira Pransky Project?

The Shira Pransky Project was founded to help English speakers in Israel better navigate the Israeli healthcare system and make use of the rights and services that are out there.

 

If this information was helpful to you, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:
Donate Now!

 

 

To your health ! לבריאות

The Ins and Outs of Elderly Patient Hospitalization

By Esther Parnes and Michal Naor

Mr. Schwartz’s Cough

Mr. Schwartz celebrated his 85th birthday in the department of internal medicine. It was his second hospitalization in the last month. He started coughing at the beginning of the winter and medical tests showed nothing. After a week’s hospitalization Mr. Schwartz was sent home, though he continued to cough and reduce his varied activities. 

Mr. Schwartz has been a pensioner for more than 10 years and his time is dedicated to his many hobbies: photography, crafts, hikes, driving and social gatherings. The CT scan done in the emergency room showed pulmonary embolism in both of his lungs. After another week of hospitalization, Mr. Schwartz went home with a selection of drugs: blood thinners and diuretics with the hope that now he would be able to return to his formerly active lifestyle. However the medicines didn’t help and his condition further deteriorated.

Although Mr. Schwartz was still able to walk on his own when he was admitted for his third hospitalization, after two days in the department of internal medicine he could no longer move his body or breathe independently and was transferred to intensive care. An ultrasound showed that there was serious damage to the right side of the heart, and the words “cardiac insufficiency” (aka heart failure) fell upon Mr. Schwartz, his wife, and his children, completely changing their lives.

Hospital routine

Cardiac insufficiency and other typical ailments of the elderly often require repeated hospitalizations, changing the daily routine of the spouse and other family members and necessitating a reorganization of family resources.

Despite the supportive medical care in the hospital, there is a physical and psychological “price” for the hospitalization. Being removed from the home and a familiar environment, dealing with the loss of various physical capabilities, and worrying what the future might bring can sometimes be the cause of confusion, loss of spirits, and even depression.

Here are some tips for handling these issues:

  1. Notify the medical staff about any changes in the psychological state of the patient in order to get proper treatment in this regard.
  2. It is important that the family be at the patient’s hospital bedside. Remember that the hospital staff with all its good will is understaffed and unable to attend to all of the patients’ needs. Without someone nearby the patient can feel helpless and requests for assistance may go unanswered.
  3. Dividing the burden among the family members can help the patient greatly. There is also the possibility of hiring nursing care for various times of day or night when family is unable to be available.
  4. It is advisable to bring along reading material, magazines, or a laptop computer in order to make the hospital stay more pleasant (but one should also take precautions to prevent possible theft of valuables). It is also possible to rent a television for the patient from hospital services.
  5. It is important to make contact with the social worker at the beginning of the hospitalization and utilize his/her services. Every department in the hospital has a social worker whose job is to assist the patient while he/she is hospitalized, and also to make certain arrangements upon his/her release.
  6. Make use of physical therapists and their services, which are available in many hospital departments to help patients regain their physical functioning, including breathing rehabilitation.

Support for the patient’s spouse

The life of the patient’s spouse is fraught with many ups and downs. His/her absence from the home and the frequent visits to the hospital often cause a decline in both physical and emotional states. Worry about the patient can sometimes cause the spouse to neglect his/her own health. In this area, too, the family needs to be on alert to the condition of the spouse.

Release from the hospital to rehabilitative care

Following hospitalization, some patients need continued medical supervision and rehabilitation. The social worker of the hospital department will suggest an appropriate care facility for the patient about to be released and will contact this facility.  Families that confer with relevant professionals, such as a gerontological consultant, receive more in depth information and assistance in proper decision making regarding the continued treatment of the patient. These care facilities are paid for by kupat cholim. The staff in these facilities include: doctors, nurses, social workers, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, and orderlies to help with patients’ needs.

Families whose loved one is to be released to rehabilitative care should note the following:

  • The family should act as soon as the hospital suggests continued treatment to facilitate the transfer to a suitable care facility. Due to lack of space in rehabilitative facilities in Israel, there is a waiting list.
  • It is important to note that the needs of the family (e.g. location of facility and accessibility) do not always match the criteria for the hospital staff recommending a facility.
  • Visit the facility in order to choose the one that is most appropriate.
  • Proper preparation on the part of the family of the patient and consulting with relevant professionals can ease the stress of the situation and may even be a deciding factor in the healing process.

Mr. Schwartz’s recovery 

Mr. Schwartz’s situation continued to improve as a result of the dedicated and professional care that he received in the hospital, and at the continuing care facility to which he was released. Upon arrival at home, special preparations were needed, details of which will be discussed in the next article.

Esther Parnes and Michal Naor are gerontological consultants. They can be reached by calling 054-765-6685 or 050-838-9490, or via the  אילת גיל הזהב Facebook page

Our strict contributed content guidelines ensure useful, informative and non-solicitous submitted content. Opinions expressed in this article are the authors’ own.

 

Related:

For related information check out our “Counseling Service for the Elderly from Bituach Leumi” and “Home Care from the Kupat Cholim” pages.

For more information on rights related to seniors, check out our All Rights Index (which is searchable and browseable), especially the Old Age and Aging Portal and Senior Health Portal.

Counseling Service for the Elderly from Bituach Leumi

 Senior Sign

Who? What? Where?

The National Insurance Institute (Bituach Leumi) operates a Counseling Service for the Elderly which is designed to assist the elderly and their families in resolving problems they may be facing.

The service is available to any elderly person in Israel who requires assistance, and is offered in all Bituach Leumi branches throughout the country. Click here for contact information.

The service is provided by retired volunteers who are trained in courses given at universities and colleges to provide counseling, guidance and practical assistance to the elderly.

 

Services

Call Center

The Counseling Service for the Elderly operates a special telephone line for the elderly and their families on aging-related issues. The service, which is provided by specially-trained volunteers, operates Sunday – Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m (you can leave a message if there is no response) and is available in the following languages:

English – 02-6463404
Hebrew – 02-6463400
Arabic – 02-6463401
Russian – 02-6463402
Amharic – 02-6463403

Counseling for the elderly and their families

The elderly and their families can obtain information, assistance, guidance and support related to claiming rights and services for the elderly from Bituach Leumi and other organizations, offices and service providers.

Regular home visits

Volunteers visit the elderly on a regular basis once a month, for about two hours. The visits are only made with the consent of the elderly person and at his/her request. Through these home visits, the volunteers forge a personal, understanding, accepting and sympathetic relationship which is so important to the elderly, to improve their emotional and economic situation. These regular visits help the elderly, reduce their loneliness and improve their lives in general.

One-time home visits

Seniors who may be at risk or in distress are identified by means of one-time home visits, which are coordinated in advance with the elderly person or his/her family. The target population includes those defined as being at risk due to impaired functioning and dependence on others, advanced age (above the age of 80) or family status (widowed). The information is obtained from the Bituach Leumi database. Those found to be in need of assistance, such as referral to a care facility, some kind of intervention or regular home visits, receive continued care and follow-up.

Support groups

The types of support groups vary from one branch to another, and are established according to the unique needs of the local population, such as the elderly blind, spouses of long-term care patients, the middle generation who are coping with the age-related crises of their elderly parents, etc.

Support groups for widows and widowers

There are support groups for widows and widowers at every branch. The main purpose of these groups is to provide emotional assistance during the crisis and support in preparing to return to their normal lives. The group facilitators are social workers and professionals in the field of elder counseling at the branches. The groups contain up to 15 participants and the meetings continue for about three months, once a week for two hours each time. Participation in the groups serves as a significant anchor for the participants – they share with other group members the process of working through their grief and coping with their personal loss, and they acquire the spiritual strength and personal validation they need to return to a normal life.

 

For more information on Bituach Leumi’s Counseling Service for the Elderly, click here.

For more information on rights related to seniors, check out our All Rights Index (which is searchable and browseable), especially the Old Age and Aging Portal and Senior Health Portal.

 

If this information was helpful to you, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:
 www.shirapranskyproject.org/donate/ 

In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) – Informational Videos

Women are entitled to have up to four IVF treatment cycles included in the healthcare basket for their first and second children and up to eight treatment cycles over the course of two years with district committee approval. For more information on rights related to IVF and fertility treatment in general, check out our All Rights Index (and search IVF), or click to view the Fertility Treatments Portal and the In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) page.

Not sure what to expect in terms of the IVF treatment process? The Ministry of Health has produced the following informational videos with English subtitles to explain how the process works and what steps are involved in terms of preparation, treatment and follow-up: 

The first step: receiving the couple for treatment

A detailed review given by a doctor and a nurse regarding the entire in-vitro fertilization process, including chances for success and possible risks.

 

Hormone treatment procedure

A detailed explanation given by a doctor and a nurse regarding the hormone treatment procedure, the treatment protocol, and the method of hormone injection.

 

Ovum retrieval procedure

A detailed description of the ovum (egg) retrieval procedure, performed under general anesthesia, and the procedure of obtaining sperm until the egg and sperm are transferred to the lab.

 

The fertilization process in the lab

Fertilization of the egg and the sperm in the lab using the appropriate method, while ensuring correct identification, sterilization, and strict work procedures.

 

Embryo transfer procedure

A description of the embryo transfer procedure. This movie includes a discussion regarding the number of the transferred embryos and details of the continued hormonal treatment.

 

Summary of treatment results

The pregnancy test performed after embryo transfer, description of the continued hormonal support in cases with a resulting pregnancy, and possible courses of action in unsuccessful cases.

 

If this information was helpful to you, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:

 www.shirapranskyproject.org/donate/ 

Child and Adolescent Health

Information in English about kids and the Israeli healthcare system!


Ever wondered…

 

As part of our on-going collaboration with Kol-Zchut, we are proud to have translated and published a comprehensive portal in English about child and adolescent health. For more information including details about kids’ rights in the healthcare system, special available services, as well as relevant benefits and entitlements, check out:

The Child and Adolescent Health Portal

kid

 

We offer these resources, along with hundreds of pages of other Israeli healthcare-related content for free to Israel’s English-speaking population.

Click here to donate now and please consider an on-going donation as everyone contributing their little part helps us do ours!

You can also help by:

  1. Spreading the word: Tell anyone and everyone you know who might be helped by our site and resources about us and what we have to offer.
  2. Collaborating with us by sharing your own knowledge, thoughts and experiences simply by leaving comments on our site and Facebook page (or simply “Liking” it) or, for the truly adventurous, in the form of a blog post (email us for more info: info@shirapranskyproject.org).

 

Not familiar with SPP?

The Shira Pransky Project (SPP) was founded to help English speakers in Israel better navigate the Israeli healthcare system and make use of the rights and services that are out there.

What we do:

 

To your health ! לבריאות

Long-Term Care Benefit

https://www.flickr.com/photos/papalars/1425443134/

Information about the Long-Term Care Benefit in English! 

A Long-Term Care Benefit is given to people who have reached retirement age, live at home in the community, and need help with daily activities (such as getting dressed, getting bathed, eating, mobility in the home, etc.), as well as elderly people who need supervision in order to prevent them from endangering themselves, or their surroundings (such as people with decreased mental faculties like Alzheimer’s disease patients who are liable to endanger themselves or their surroundings if left home alone).

The benefit is generally provided in the form of services, and is usually not monetary in nature!

As part of our on-going collaboration with Kol-Zchut, we are proud to have translated and published a Rights Guide for the Mentally Ill and Their Families. While a number of the links in the guide still lead to Hebrew content, it is an easy-to-read, critical and unique resource of information that was not previously available in English. You can either view the guide below or click here to follow an external link. 

Related information:

 

Not familiar with AACI’s Shira Pransky Project?

AACI’s Shira Pransky Project was founded to help English speakers in Israel better navigate the Israeli healthcare system and make use of the rights and services that are out there.

 

If this information was helpful to you, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:
Donate Now!

 

 

To your health ! לבריאות

Children with Special Needs – Rights, Benefits and Services

In addition to the inherent difficulties of parenting, parents of children with special needs find themselves confronted with many financial, social and bureaucratic hardships when trying to get the best available support and services for their children. These hardships are simply compounded for immigrants and those who do not speak Hebrew as a first language. The information on this page is primarily relevant for children with sensory, developmental, cognitive or motor disorders and their families.

Know to Ask

Review the various rights, benefits and services highlighted in this checklist to become more knowledgeable about what is available before making an appointment with the Kupat Cholim social worker at your local branch, a social worker from an aid organization, or another guidance professional for information and assistance in accessing support. Download a printable version of this checklist by clicking here. You can print out that checklist and go over it with the support professional. Please note that many items have eligibility conditions related to age, means, insurance membership or other factors.

Discounts, Exemptions and Assistance from the Health Plans

Education

Financial Assistance and Other Benefits

Employment

Supportive and Nursing Care

Patient Support Organizations

This is not an exclusive list, check out the “Children” section of our organizations directory for more organizations. If you have a need for a service you do not see here, we urge you to make your need known. If it is not already addressed by an existing program, many organizations will use their resources to facilitate your individual needs in any way possible.

General Services

Counseling, Support and Rehabilitation

Recreation and Respite

Specialized Organizations

More Organizations

  • ALEH (severe cognitive and physical disabilities) 02-501-1000
  • Kav-Or (distance learning in hospitals) 077-717-1919
  • Tlalim (educational support) 02-571-0555
  • Variety Israel (financial assistance) 03-644-7220

Where to Turn

Here are your primary avenues for receiving helpful information. Remember to be persistent in seeking clear and comprehensive details about assistance and the means to access it. There are multiple sources for guidance and often you need to pursue more than one.

  • Kupat Cholim Social Workers: Every health fund employs a social work staff with hours available to address any of your needs. Speak to your branch secretary about office hours or to arrange an appointment. The Child Development Services branches also offer assistance from social workers.
  • Organization Social Workers and Other Assistance Professionals: Many patient support organizations offer guidance to the community they serve through social workers or counselors providing specialized information and assistance.
  • School Social Workers and Other Assistance Professionals: Many schools with special needs programs offer guidance to their parents through social workers or counselors providing specialized information and assistance.

What Assistance Can You Expect?

  • Information about rights and services that relate specifically to a person’s circumstances, and practical guidance on acquiring them.
  • Practical insight, and some hand holding, on navigating the system, whether it be within the healthcare system, in government bureaucracy or the education system.
  • Help finding and connecting with organizations dedicated to particular conditions, where there may be even more resources of specific interest to you.
  • Help with emotional coping in difficult situations.

A Few Tips:

  • Schedule a sit-down meeting with enough time blocked out to discuss what you need.
  • Delegate tasks to accomplish your goals. Note the things you need to do (e.g. call this office, obtain these documents, etc.) and the things the social worker is committing to doing (e.g. calling that office, finding out about that service, getting those forms, etc.).
  • Schedule the next contact. e.g. The social worker will call you in two days with some follow-up information, or you will meet again in a week to fill out forms together, etc.
  • Show your appreciation. Everyone in the healthcare sector chose to go into a profession dedicated to helping others. The social workers especially, did not do it for the glamour.

The information appearing here, along with some more resources, also appears in the Children with Special Needs Portal and the Special Education and Integration into Regular Education Portal we translated as part of our collaboration with the Kol-Zchut organization. Comprehensive information for parents of children with special needs can also be found in the Kesher Organization’s Ksharim Booklet.

Remember that a printable, slightly modified PDF version of this checklist may be found here.

 

If this checklist helped you or a loved one, please consider supporting The Shira Pransky Project by visiting:
ShiraPranskyProject.org/donate

Pregnancy, Birth and Maternity Info in English!

Finally, comprehensive and useful info in English for new and expectant moms and dads!

Ever wondered…

 

As part of our on-going collaboration with Kol-Zchut, we are proud to have translated and published the most comprehensive source of information in English for expectant and new mothers and fathers in Israel:

The Pregnancy and Birth Portal

 

We offer these resources, along with hundreds of pages of other Israeli healthcare-related content for free to Israel’s Anglo population, and in exchange we just ask that you:

  1. Spread the word by telling anyone and everyone you know who might be helped by our site and resources about us and what we have to offer.
  2. Participate by sharing your own knowledge, thoughts and experiences simply by leaving comments on our site and Facebook page or, for the truly adventurous, in the form of a blog post (email us for more info: info@shirapranskyproject.org).
  3. Partner with us by contributing to the Project so we can continue expanding and promoting critical information in English for you, your friends, family and all of Israel’s Anglo population!
    Click here to donate now and please consider an on-going donation as everyone contributing their little part helps us do ours!

 

Not familiar with SPP?

The Shira Pransky Project (SPP) was founded to help English speakers in Israel better navigate the Israeli healthcare system and make use of the rights and services that are out there.

What we do:

 

To your health!

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New Virtual Community for English Speaking Families of Children with Special Needs

The Shira Pransky Project is happy to pass along the following announcement from Kesher– The Home for Special Families:

Kesher-The Home for Special Families

In honor of the New Year, Kesher– The Home for Special Families, is thrilled to announce the establishment of an innovative Virtual Community for English speaking families of children with special needs!

Kesher is a leading organization inIsrael that works to create informed, empowered, and motivated families of children with special needs. We strive towards significant social change through advocacy, developmen

Our new Virtual Community, based off of a highly successful pre-existing model for Hebrew speakers, will offer English speaking families the opportunity to serve as participatory members of a large and diverse community of special families in Israel, comprised of Hebrew, Arabic, and Russian speaking members.t, and social service programs.

Virtual Community participants are offered:

  • Regular email updates concerning, benefits, legislation, new services, conferences, lectures and more.
  • The opportunity to participate in all other Kesher activities including:
    • Lectures and Workshops for Families
    • Training for Parents and Professionals
    • Information and guidance from our Information Center: 1-700-501-601 (makom-m.cet.co.il)
    • Access to our ‘Connecting Parents’ Portal (www.horimbekesher.co.il).

Together, we will not stand alone.

Together, we will work to realize equal rights.

Together, we will strengthen and support each other.

And together, we will constitute an empowered part of Israeli society.

Kesher invites you to join in our family, and ask that you forward this information to all relevant families and professionals.

For more information, or to join our Resource Center please contact us:

 Alana Ebin, Anglo Communities Coordinator

KesherEnglishFamilies@gmail.com

Telephone: 02-6236116

Fax: 02-6246390

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Home Care from the Kupat Cholim

home_heart

About this Benefit

All of the kupot cholim (health plans) offer home care services to patients who can’t get all of the medical services they need due to difficulty leaving the home. A full range of medical services are provided with home visits from doctors, nurses, and social workers, as well as paramedical providers, like physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, and others.

Who is Entitled

Home care services are intended for patients who are confined to their homes temporarily or permanently due to their medical/physical condition and are not able to receive services in the kupat cholim branches.  For Example: 

  • Patients with chronic illness
  • Patients returning home after hospitalization
  • Oncology patients
  • The elderly

How to Get it

Individuals may be referred to the Home Care Unit (יחידה לטיפול בית or יחידה להמשך טיפול)  by hospital staff, a family doctor, local social services or by contacting the unit directly. Contact information can be obtained from your local branch secretary or your kupat cholim’s information hotline.

Cancer patients may be entitled to additional home care through the Israel Cancer Association. Click here for more information.

Resources

 

If this information was helpful to you, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:

 www.shirapranskyproject.org/donate/