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PEP – Treatment in fear of exposure to HIV

The following is a translation and edit of an article on www.aidsisrael.org.il. For more information see the full article [Hebrew] by clicking here

PEP

PEP – Treatment given in cases of fear of exposure to the HIV virus. Your condom is torn during sexual intercourse; Are you afraid of being exposed to HIV? There are some things that everyone needs to know:

What is PEP?

POST 

EXPOSURE 

PROPHYLAXISpreventive treatment 

PEP is a treatment given after exposure to HIV and its goal is to minimize the risk of infection.

Is  PEP  a new invention?

For years, PEP has been used to prevent HIV infection in cases of high-risk exposure. For example, if a medical staff member is exposed to a contagious fluid (for example, stabbed from a syringe containing HIV positive blood), he or she is offered the preventive treatment that should significantly reduce the chances of contracting the virus. This treatment is also offered in hospitals to victims of sexual assault or to partners of HIV positive people if the condom is broken. PEP is actually a drug that is taken for 28 days and is based on the combined drug therapy that people living with HIV take throughout their lives.

In what situations should I consider PEP ?

If one of the following conditions occurs:

1. Almost certain exposure to the virus, for example, you are HIV negative and in a relationship with someone who is positive. Although you are always careful about protected sex – something happens and the condom breaks at the time of penetration.

2. Possible exposure to the virus, such as having unprotected sex with a partner whose HIV status is unknown, and a condom rupture during penetration.

3. Having unprotected sex that involves penetration with a partner whose HIV status is unknown or known to be positive.

Some clear cases in which treatment is recommended: 

  1. A needle stabbing from a person living with HIV (mainly occupational exposure).
  2. People who have been penetrated without a condom by a person living with HIV and whose therapeutic status is unknown.  
  3. Victims of sexual assault. (If a call to the ER is made up to 72 hours).

How do you get and who decides on it?

If you are concerned about HIV, contact the emergency room of one of the listed hospitals below as soon as possible (and no later than 72 hours after exposure). Treatment can be requested 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Where can I get the treatment?

In each of the following seven emergency rooms (24 hours a day, 7 days a week):

  • Soroka, Beer Sheva
  • Kaplan, Rehovot
  • Hadassah Ein Karem, Jerusalem
  • Sheba, Tel Hashomer
  • Ichilov, Tel Aviv
  • Meir, Kfar Saba
  • Rambam Medical Center, Haifa

Remember: the treatment is not given to anyone who wants it, and the decision is made by the doctor in the emergency room.  The doctor will decide whether or not to prescribe the treatment, only after consulting an infectious disease specialist or an HIV doctor from the hospital’s AIDS center, since this is a treatment with rare but life-threatening side effects, the doctor will try to see if the risk of infection in your case justifies the chances The doctor will ask you some questions related to your sex habits and the last time you have unprotected sex.

Can I go directly to the emergency room or need a referral?

A visit to the hospital must be paid by a fee, unless there is a commitment from the health fund (hitchayvut/Form 17), or in cases defined in advance by the Ministry of Health and in the regulations of the health funds. HIV prevention is not one of these cases, so in order to be exempt from a screening visit, you must have a hitchayvut. How do you do this? One way is to visit a family doctor and ask for a referral to the ER. It may be a cumbersome way of scheduling or trying to get into a doctor without a queue because of an emergency, and time is pressing. The simplest and fastest way would be to call the HMO call center and ask to speak to the nurses’ center. If the nurse at the center approves the need for an emergency appointment, the telephone call is recorded on the computer and is considered according to the fund’s regulations as a liability of the fund for all intents and purposes. In some cases the nurse may require you to visit your GP. In such a situation, you must clarify the urgency of the matter and insist on receiving a referral from the call center.

In any case, remember: Arriving at the ER without a commitment from a doctor or a nurses’ center will cost you NIS 715, even if the visit is medically justified.

What happens to a caller when he arrives at the ER?

A number of tests are performed at the ER. First, an HIV test that checks whether there has been past infection (and then any unnecessary preventive treatment). In addition, a blood count is performed and a liver and kidney function test is performed to determine a health condition that does not allow taking the treatment. In addition, in case of exposure to sexual relations, antibiotic treatment was provided to cover other sexually transmitted diseases (gonorrhea and chlamydia). At the end of the tests, and after the consultation of the emergency doctor with a physician aids are given in sorting out several doses of treatment for the next day or two. During the course of the treatment, the person is instructed to perform additional tests, the most important of which is, of course, HIV testing after three weeks of treatment. Which prevents, to ensure that no adhesion occurred.

What would they ask me in the emergency room? 

The questions that the doctor will ask you in the emergency room can be very personal and cause a feeling of discomfort. You will be asked to talk about the partner with unprotected sex, you will be asked about the sexual act, when was, what included what was your role in sex and whether there was ejaculation inside or outside. Remember that the doctor asks for all this information not to satisfy his curiosity but to make the right decision about your health. In any case, all the information you tell your doctor needs medical confidentiality so that you can be calm. The more accurate information you provide, the more appropriate a decision can be made by your doctor regarding the need for preventive care and its composition.

So take or not take?

Whether to take or not to take lies in the benefit of treatment versus its risks. Treatment is not easy in many cases and sometimes even life-threatening. Another important fact is that the side effects of the treatment may be difficult. Usually more severe than the side effects experienced by people living with HIV and taking the treatment for many years. For these reasons, complex therapeutic protocols have been written that weigh the risk of infection compared with the risk of side effects, according to which the AIDS doctors decide whether to give the treatment or not. 

When should I seek treatment?

The faster the better! The efficacy of the treatment depends on the time that has passed since the exposure: the closer the treatment is to the time of exposure, the more effective it is. If 72 hours have elapsed since the exposure, PEP will not be given in any case because treatment is no longer effective.

It has recently been shown that taking the treatment more than 48 hours after exposure reduces its effectiveness significantly, so in situations where PEP is recommended, this should be done as soon as possible !!!

Some things to know about  PEP :

– PEP is not a “day after” pill and is definitely not a substitute for condom use.

Treatment reduces the chances of HIV infection but is not 100% effective.

– Treatment must commence as soon as possible as of the date of exposure, and in any event not later than 72 hours from the moment the incident occurred.

– The treatment is not given to anyone who asks, and in any case, it is possible to receive it only in emergency rooms with the instruction of a specialist.

– Treatment is based on some of the combined drug therapy taken by people living with HIV.

Treatment has short- and long-term side effects. Sometimes these are serious phenomena. (And therefore, as noted, can not be given to any person who requests it and under the instruction of a specialist doctor only).

So now I know there is a PEP, why should I continue using the condom?

Well, simply because PEP is not a protective measure and it certainly is not a substitute for a condom. This is not a “day after” pill, but a complex drug treatment with side effects that can be determined by an emergency room doctor. In the case of PEP, the doctor will decide for you. They have the full professional authority to refuse you.

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Therapy Through the Kupat Cholim

As of July 2015, the responsibility for providing mental health services to the public was transferred from the Ministry of Health to the Kupot Cholim. For the average Kupah member (in non-acute and non-critical situations) this means figuring out how to receive therapy, possibly preceded by a psychological assessment or diagnosis.

For all mental health services you should start with your primary care doctor for referral. Once you find out where you need to go, check with the Kupah secretary or information service to see if you will need a Hitchayvut

Outpatient Clinics

There are therapists available in outpatient clinics of general and psychiatric hospitals, or community clinics run by, (or by agreement with), the Kupat Cholim. These options are the cheapest (ranging from free to around 32 shekels, once per quarter), and you may be able to find one close to home. On the other hand, it may take a lot of time to get started, and your flexibility in choosing the right therapist for you may be limited.

Independent Therapist

The way that many people consider ideal, is choosing an independent therapist. This option is more expensive (around 55 shekels for the first visit and 132 for each subsequent session), and still does not mean unlimited choice. The Kupah has a listing of independent therapists from which to choose (links below). The listing will include location and may also include the languages in which the therapist will work. You can contact these therapists directly until you find the right one and make an appointment.  At the Kupah, you will have to pay the co-payment and get a Hitchayvut to bring to the therapists’ office.

Useful Links:

Accident Insurance and What to Do When a Child Gets Hurt

By Aviva Yoselis
Our strict contributed content guidelines ensure useful, informative and non-solicitous submitted content. Opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own.


Active Children Get Hurt

kid scraped kneeThe other day, I realized that there are actually people living in Israel who’ve never been to the Emergency Room, who’ve never had to take a bleeding child to the extended hours clinic to be stitched up, who’ve never looked at the chip in their child’s tooth after a fall from a slide and said, ‘yep, that tooth is gonna have to be fixed’. Now, before you stop reading in horror and say, my goodness what a negligent mother, let me just inform you that I have active boys. Three of them. Really active. And active girls who play with the active boys. We’ve been stitched, glued, x-rayed, bandaged…

So here are some important facts to know if your child, grandchild, niece, nephew or little neighbor gets hurt:

Accident Insurance for School Aged Children

Teeth

If a school age child (pre-K through 12th grade) has any type of tooth injury, chipped, knocked out, cracked,…treatment is covered by the school insurance, even if it didn’t happen on school property or during school hours. This means, that yes, the eight year old girl who was chasing her brother around the house, tripped, and cracked her two newly grown front teeth in half, can get full reconstruction of those teeth for free.

To go about this, you need to call the national insurance company (not connected to your kupah): 1-800-44-33-44 [in Hebrew only], give them your child’s information and they will call you back with a number and a list of eligible dental clinics. With that number and a letter from the school secretary saying your child is a student, you can make an appointment and go to one of the approved clinics.

Accident Injury

The insurance that you purchase at the beginning of each school year (mandatory~75 NIS), covers your school age child for all kinds of accidents (except for car and terrorist events-that’s through Bituach Leumi). If your child is hurt falling out of a tree, falling off a bike, injured on the playground, even if it didn’t happen on school property or during school hours, your child is eligible for insurance coverage. If they have a temporary disability, they may also receive coverage for that. Contact the secretary of the school for relevant phone numbers of the insurance.

Things to Remember

Head/facial wounds bleed, a lot

If the child comes in from the outside with blood running down their cheek, take a deep breath and wash the wound off first. Sometimes even small cuts look massive in the beginning.

If the injury looks deep, take the child to the nearest extended hours clinic of your kupah (not the ER unless it’s after midnight). Make sure you know where this clinic is before there’s an accident, so you don’t have to call around in the moment of panic. Put the number and address up on your fridge so it’s accessible. If there is an injury around the eye, or the cut is especially deep, know that the extended hours clinic or Terem may end up sending you to the ER to be stitched; you still need to go to the kupah clinic first, and then go to the ER with a referral, in order for the ER fee to be covered by the kupah.

[Editor’s note: If the situation is truly urgent, and wasted time contributes to the danger, do not pause for preliminary concerns. Click here to read more about Medical Attention Any Time and in Emergencies.]

Possible concussions

If the child is unconscious or loses consciousness, feels dizzy or vomits after a falling injury, take the child to the ER immediately.


Aviva Yoselis, MPH, founder and director of Health Advize and Viva Research Institute, is an expert in the field of health research, health behavior modification and shared medical decision making. She has over 20 years of experience facilitating seminars and teaching classes on health behavior and health system navigation. Aviva is skilled in identifying key points in complex situations, and looking at a range of possible solutions. Feel free to download her free guide on navigating the Israel Health Care system at http://healthadvize.com/contact-us/.

Ezer Mitzion’s Respite Program for Children with Special Needs

Empowering children and giving caregivers respite

respite

Ezer Mitzion’s respite program, allows your child to benefit from a change of scenery by spending  time with a host family  in a warm, supportive and caring environment. The program is designed to empower children, promoting their independence, whilst simultaneously giving caregivers a well deserved break.  

Host families are individually chosen  to meet children’s needs, and are trained by Specialist  staff to care for their special guests.  

Parents can choose their child’s host family from people they already know,  or from the pool of host families at “Ezer Mitzion.”All host families, undergo rigorous testing and training process and are monetarily compensated for hosting children.

  • The service is provided under the supervision of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services and supervised by qualified Social Workers.
  • The program is available Israel-wide and available year round, including Shabbat and Chagim
  • Professional Staff accompany the host family during the child’s stay
  • The service is open to all citizens of Israel, irrespective of religion, race or gender
  • There is an 24-hour emergency response

Target Population and Eligibility

Children and teens meeting the following criteria:

  • Aged 3-21 years old (in specific cases from 0-3 and 21-25)
  • Registered in one of three programs with Misrad Harevacha – Ministry of Social Affairs, Department for People with an Intellectual disability,  Department for  Treatment for People with Autism and  Department for Rehabilitation.

How to participate in the program?

  • Interested families are advised to contact the secretary of the program,  to join the database of host families.
  • Contact the Ezer Mitzion  respite program, via phone 073-3956783/4, or by email: chavim@ami.org.il Fax: 073-951120

Important Information:

  • The host family receives payments for hosting and accommodation, (the payment amounts to 180 Shekel for a midweek stay and 360 shekel for a weekend.

For more information from Ezer Mitzion click here.

Medical Cannabis

סוכנות ישראלית ממשלתית לקנאביס רפואי

סוכנות ישראלית ממשלתית לקנאביס רפואי

“Cannabis is a substance that is defined as a “dangerous drug”. Medical Cannabis is not a medicine, it is not registered as a medicine, and its efficacy and safety when used for medical purposes has not yet been established. Nevertheless, there is evidence that cannabis could help patients suffering from certain medical conditions, and alleviate their suffering.”

Thus opens the homepage of the Medical Cannabis Unit of the Ministry of Health (MoH)  with as much clarity of purpose as can be mustered for the apparently loaded subject.

Over twenty thousand patients currently have permits for the use of medical cannabis in Israel, and over many years the means of supplying the substance to those in need have slowly progressed to the point where Israeli researchers, growers and distributors have gained international recognition as innovators. The evolution of policies is ongoing, with an expansion of availability seemingly around the corner. Still, the following is a summary of the current state of affairs, and will be updated when the MoH administration plans are fully implemented.

Cannabis is Not in the Healthcare Basket

“The Ministry of Health wishes to remove obstacles to the supply of this drug to patients who could benefit from it medically and who wish to purchase it at their own expense.”

MoH website

This means that the MoH regulates who is allowed to use medical cannabis and who is allowed to supply it, but they are not obliged to provide it through the public healthcare system or cover its cost. Instead, permitted patients subscribe to a specific licensed supplier and pay a monthly fee. Currently this fee is NIS 380 per month, to which additional charges may be added for delivery, equipment, or other accompanying expenses.

One issue that has been recognized by patients and officials is the fact that the monthly fee bears no relationship to the prescribed amount of the drug that the patient receives. This may be changed in future policies, and there is always the possibility that eventually the committee in charge of the health basket will add cannabis to the list of medications that the government primarily finances for patients.

Another innovation that is planned by the MoH is to have the drug available from regular pharmacies instead of specially designated distributors, though this plan has not yet been implemented.

How to Receive a License

The request for a permit is an electronic form available on the MoH website that is filled out on the computer and then printed to be faxed or mailed to the Medical Cannabis Unit by a doctor specializing in the medical field of which the patient is afflicted. One notable exception The Ministry of Health has given oncologists in most of the major hospitals in the country the direct authority to issue medical cannabis licenses.

Currently, requests are not accepted from family doctors and general practitioners, though ministry officials have stated their plan to offer a short training course to any doctor in order to qualify for prescribing the drug. Theoretically, they will even be allowed to issue licenses directly, though this will not be clear until the plan is implemented.

The Recommending Doctor’s Responsibilities

The patient-doctor relationship plays a central role in the MoH’s approach to issuing licenses. The recommending doctor is specifically associated with the license that is issued and if the patient changes doctors the license will have to be updated. If there is any change of status of the patient under treatment, it is the responsibility of the doctor to update the Medical Cannabis Unit’s administration. The doctor must perform medical follow-ups with the patient every three months for the first year of treatment and every six months afterwards.

Recognized Conditions and Indications

The following conditions are currently recognized explicitly by the Ministry of Health as entitled to consideration for a license:

  • Oncology Patients
  • Chronic Pain
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Tourette’s Syndrome
  • Terminally ill patients
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

In most cases patients are expected to have exhausted other conventional treatment options before they can receive a license. There are also other explicit indications for treatment for each condition.

All specialist doctors may make a recommendation for a medical cannabis license and either petition the indications committee of the Ministry of Health to add a new indication to the list or request individual exceptions for conditions not currently in the list that the doctor feels warrants the use of cannabis for the patient.

Further Resources

Ministry of Health:

Tikun Olam, Israel’s most prominent growing, research, and distribution organization:

Kupat Cholim Discounts on Glasses

woman-glasses

You may be eligible to receive discounts on purchasing glasses from your kupat cholim if you are a member of their additional health service plans. All of the kupot cholim have agreements with specific stores, or their own stores, where the discounts they offer are available. Be sure to ask the secretary at your local clinic, or the information hotline to locate a participating store. You will also have to fulfill the eligibility requirements to get your discount. We have summarized the discounts and conditions below, but be sure to check your eligibility directly with the kupat cholim.

Maccabi

Gold Members

Adults with the following diagnosed vision problems are entitled to partial coverage for the cost of plastic glasses lenses or contact lenses. Children are eligible for these same benefits, or a blanket discount of up to 600 NIS for one pair of frames and lenses per year without specific diagnosis requirements.

  • Shortsightedness or farsightedness of 7 or higher (5 up to age 10): 83% discount up to a ceiling of 510 NIS on one pair of glasses lenses or one pair of contact lenses per year, or a discount of 83% up to a ceiling 225 NIS on the purchase of a single contact lens 
  • Astigmatism or a cylinder of number 7 or higher: 83% discount up to a ceiling of 1,995 NIS on one pair of glasses lenses per year
  • Keratoconus: 83% discount up to a ceiling of 1,995 NIS on one pair of glasses lenses per year, or 998 NIS off the purchase of a single lens or 1,995 NIS off the purchase of one pair of contact lenses per year
  • After a corneal transplant or corneal therapy: 83% discount up to a ceiling of 1,995 NIS on the purchase of one pair of contact lenses or an 83% discount up to a ceiling of 998 NIS on the purchase of a single lens per year

Sheli Members

Members are eligible for any discounts available to gold members. In addition, Sheli members who need glasses are entitled to a 50% discount on the purchase of eyeglasses, sunglasses and contact lenses at participating stores. This discount can be used on multiple purchases over 3 years until reaching a ceiling of 1,002 NIS discounted (total purchase cost of  2,004 NIS). The full discount credit is renewed every 3 years. This discount cannot be combined with the discount on plastic glasses lenses available for the specific conditions listed above, but the member may choose which benefit to receive. 

Click here for full details in Hebrew on the Maccabi website.

Meuhedet

Si Members

Children up to age 18 are entitled to purchase prescription glasses once a year costing up to NIS 700 with a co-payment of 10%. When the glasses cost more than NIS 700, members pay the difference plus 70 shekels.

Adults 70 years and older are eligible for the same discount as children for regular glasses or a discount on multifocal or bifocal glasses up to a ceiling of 1,200 NIS with a co-payment of 10% once every two years. When the multifocals or bifocals cost more than 1,200 NIS, members pay the difference plus 120 NIS. 

Click here for full details in Hebrew on the Meuhedet website.

Leumit

Gold and Silver Members

Adults are are eligible for up to 70% total discounts on frames and lenses on purchases made at participating stores. Prices are determined based on the specific frame and lens choice. Children are eligible for free glasses ((frame, optical lenses and anti-reflex coating) up to 650 NIS ceiling with a 21 NIS co-payment. 

Click here for full details in Hebrew on the Meuhedet website.

Clalit

Mushlam Platinum members

Children up to age 18 are entitled to a discount on glasses up to 600 NIS once per calendar year. If the cost exceeds 600 NIS the member pays the difference. The benefit includes checking eyesight and glasses (frame, optical lenses and anti-reflex coating). Alternatively, you can use this benefit for the purchase of contact lenses.

Click here for full details in Hebrew on the Clalit website.

See Also:

 

Mental Health Reform in Effect, as of July 1, 2015

The following update was contributed by Debbie Burack, a volunteer for AACI’s Shira Pransky Project. 

In May 2012 the Deputy Minister of Health, Rabbi Yaakov Litzman, signed a government order to establish the Mental Health Reform. Until that date, mental health services were not in the basket of services provided by the kupot cholim (HMOs), and were instead under the direct responsibilities of the Ministry of Health.

On July 1, 2015, this Mental Health Reform officially went into effect. Essentially, the kupot cholim now assume responsibility for all mental health services. This change demonstrates a progressive recognition of the integral connection between health of the body and health of the mind. It also helps to reduce any stigma attached to receiving treatment for mental health conditions.

Click here for general overview of the Mental Health Reform on the Ministry of Health website.

Highlights of the Mental Health Reform:

What?

  • In the same way that physical medical services are provided by your doctors on the kupot cholim, all mental health services are now provided or funded by the kupot cholim.
  • Founded on the judgment of clinical professionals, basic services include:
    • Psychiatric hospitalization services
    • Clinic based services, such as diagnosis, assessment, counseling, crisis intervention, personal, family or group treatment, follow-up and maintenance
    • Day treatment at a clinic

Who?

  • Regardless of age, any resident or citizen of Israel is entitled to receive these services, as per the recommendation of a medical professional. Treatment will be given in accordance with need.

  • If you have already been receiving mental health treatment, you should continue going to the same provider. Private information about your diagnosis and previous treatment will be transferred confidentially to your kupat cholim, with your permission. This is done in order to help your family physician achieve optimal outcomes when treating your total health.

How?

  • Information regarding how to seek and receive mental health treatment is provided by your respective kupat cholim. Either ask your family doctor, or call the moked (call center) of your kupat cholim. This process works the same way even with an individual who is currently in a rehabilitative framework.
  • In the event of mental distress that requires immediate care, you may go to a psychiatric emergency room at no charge, when your family physician or treatment provider is not available. Every mental health center has a 24 hour emergency room, and no referral is needed. You can also proceed to the emergency room of a general hospital, where psychiatric consultants are on duty. 

In order to implement quality control of the professional mental health services provided by the kupot cholim, supervision and monitoring will be conducted by the Mental Health Division of the Ministry of Health. If the kupat cholim is overburdened, there may be a wait period until treatment is received. However, the Ministry of Health plans to oversee that waiting times are reasonable.

Click here for Frequently Asked Questions about individual rights and specific mental conditions on the Ministry of Health website.

This update was contributed by a volunteer for AACI’s Shira Pransky Project. Debbie Burack moved to Israel twenty years ago and has been writing ever since. She writes on a wide array of subjects, with specialties in consumer health education and topics in art and design. For more info and to see her writing portfolio, contact: tothepointdrb@gmail.com.

Subsidized therapy for those coping with illness and loss

Tishkofet Ma’agan (Life’s Door) offers subsidized therapy for those coping with illness and loss. The basic subsidized rate is 180 NIS per session, but further subsidies are available and each client’s needs and means are assessed individually.

For more information, contact Margo: mhelman@tishkofet.co.il, 02-631-2635.

Tishkofet Therapy Program

“Fast Track” for Submitting a General Disability Pension Claim

Those submitting any type of health-related claim in Israel whether it be to the National Insurance Institute (Bituach Leumi), the kupot cholim, or the Ministry of Health, unfortunately often have to wait a long time for the claim to be processed and approved.

Fortunately, at least with regard to General Disability Pension claims, there is some relief available in the form of a “Fast Track” process for those suffering from serious conditions.

As part of our on-going collaboration with Kol-Zchut, we are proud to have translated and published this easy-to-read, critical and unique resource that was not previously available in English. You can either view the information below or click here to follow an external link. 

 

Related information:

 

Not familiar with AACI’s Shira Pransky Project?

AACI’s Shira Pransky Project was founded to help English speakers in Israel better navigate the Israeli healthcare system and make use of the rights and services that are out there.

 

If this information was helpful to you, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:
Donate Now!

 

 

To your health ! לבריאות

Stroke Victims – Benefits and Support in Israel

Individuals who have been diagnosed has having had a stroke are hospitalized for treatment and monitoring. After hospitalization, they undergo either out-patient or in-patient rehabilitation in order to best regain their functioning capacity.

Depending on the severity of the stroke, the rehabilitation process and other factors, a variety of benefits and support options are available to stroke victims in Israel. 

As part of our on-going collaboration with Kol-Zchut, we are proud to have translated and published this easy-to-read, critical and unique resource of information that was not previously available in English. You can either view the guide below or click here to follow an external link. 

 

Related information:

 

Not familiar with AACI’s Shira Pransky Project?

AACI’s Shira Pransky Project was founded to help English speakers in Israel better navigate the Israeli healthcare system and make use of the rights and services that are out there.

 

If this information was helpful to you, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:
Donate Now!

 

 

To your health ! לבריאות

Eating Disorders – Treatment and Support Options in Israel

An eating disorder refers to a number of psychological disorders related to insufficient food intake or overeating. Individuals suffering from them may have difficulty admitting that they have a problem before seeking help.
Coverage and provision of services for eating disorders is essentially the same as any other psychological disorder.

How do I get treatment for an eating disorder?

  • Discuss the steps to finding treatment with your general practitioner. You may need to see a diagnostic psychiatrist or psychologist to get referred to specific treatment.
  • You can also make an appointment with a kupah social worker at your local clinic for additional guidance.

Where can I get treatment and what does it entail?

  • There are clinics specializing in treatment of eating disorders that are either directly operated by the kupat cholim, or are private and may or may not be affiliated with a specific kupah.
  • Treatment options  may be either in-patient or out-patient and the specific type of referral is based on the severity of the patient’s condition.
  • The vast majority of eating disorders are treated through out-patient care, while those who are hospitalized are generally placed in the facility’s mental health ward or a department specializing in eating disorders.
  • Care is generally provided by a multi-disciplinary professional team comprised of doctors, mental health professionals, dieticians and other professionals.
  • Updated listings of treatment facilities with which the kupah is affiliated should be requested directly from the kupah.
  • The Israeli Association for Eating Disorders (IAED) website has a comprehensive listing of public and private facilities specializing in treatment of eating disorders (in Hebrew). 

What organizations offer support for eating disorders?

 
Related Information:

Special Services Benefit (Attendance Allowance)

Information about the Special Services Benefit (Attendance Allowance) in English! 

A Special Services Benefit (Attendance Allowance) is paid to certain adults with medical disability who require significant assistance from another person in performing daily activities, or who need constant supervision to prevent them from posing a risk to their own lives or the lives of others.

Please note: The National Insurance Institute refers to the Special Services Benefit (a direct translation of the Hebrew קצבת שירותים מיוחדים) as an “Attendance Allowance”. 

As part of our on-going collaboration with Kol-Zchut, we are proud to have translated and published this easy-to-read, critical and unique resource of information that was not previously available in English. You can either view the guide below or click here to follow an external link. 

Related information:

 

Not familiar with AACI’s Shira Pransky Project?

AACI’s Shira Pransky Project was founded to help English speakers in Israel better navigate the Israeli healthcare system and make use of the rights and services that are out there.

 

If this information was helpful to you, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:
Donate Now!

 

 

To your health ! לבריאות

Diabetes Portal

Diabetics being treated for diabetes with insulin or other medications are considered to be chronically ill and are thus entitled to various benefits from the health plans and related to various medical services. Due to the fact that each health plan has different policies, it always recommended to clarify all relevant rights and entitlements with your health plan.

As part of our on-going collaboration with Kol-Zchut, we are proud to have translated and published the Diabetes Portal in English. While a number of the links in the portal still lead to Hebrew content, it is an easy-to-read, critical and unique resource of information that was not previously available in English. You can either view the guide below or click here to follow an external link. 

 

Related information:

 


Not familiar with AACI’s Shira Pransky Project?

AACI’s Shira Pransky Project was founded to help English speakers in Israel better navigate the Israeli healthcare system and make use of the rights and services that are out there.

 

If this information was helpful to you, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:
Donate Now!

 

 

To your health ! לבריאות

Rights Guide for the Mentally Ill and Their Families

Unfortunately, the mental health system is one of the most neglected aspects of the Israeli healthcare system. Many people are even more ignorant about their rights within the mental health system than they are about general healthcare rights. 

As part of our on-going collaboration with Kol-Zchut, we are proud to have translated and published a Rights Guide for the Mentally Ill and Their Families. While a number of the links in the guide still lead to Hebrew content, it is an easy-to-read, critical and unique resource of information that was not previously available in English. You can either view the guide below or click here to follow an external link. 

 

Related information:

 


Not familiar with AACI’s Shira Pransky Project?

AACI’s Shira Pransky Project was founded to help English speakers in Israel better navigate the Israeli healthcare system and make use of the rights and services that are out there.

 

If this information was helpful to you, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:
Donate Now!

 

 

To your health ! לבריאות