Pesach Cleaning Agents And Chemicals Safety Guidelines

pesach poison

In preparation for the Passover holiday, the Ministry of Health has shared the following safety rules for use of cleaning agents and chemicals prepared by Prof. Yedidia Bentur, of the Israel Poison Information Center at Rambam Medical Center and Orly Silvinger, of the Beterem Organization for Child Safety:

  • Cleaning agents are to be kept out of reach of children, in a high or locked place. Once the use is over, they must be returned to their place and the container closed, in order to prevent ingestion or inhalation of toxic and caustic agents.
  • It is advisable to purchase cleaning agents and drugs in packages that are difficult for children to open.
  • Do not mix cleaning agents, particularly acids and bleaches, these mixtures discharge toxic gases and may be dangerous in the case of inhalation.
  • Make sure to keep cleaning agents and drugs in their original package and keep the package shut. Do not store cleaning agents in drink bottles, even if the bottle states “Toxic” – toddlers cannot read.
  • Do not store cleaning agents near food products or drink cups.
  • Carefully reading the product’s directions before use, with special attention to warnings, may benefit both adults and children.
  • Drugs that are not in use or that have expired, cleaning agents and pesticides, paints and paint thinners that are not in use should be safely removed from the home without children having access to them.

In any case of exposure or suspected exposure to a toxic agent, seek medical assistance or contact the Israel Poison Information Center, Rambam Medical Center, telephone 04-7771900.

Click here for the full article on the Ministry of Health English website.

Out-of-Balance

By Ilene Bloch-Levy

I used to view my life as a daily task in which I smoothly navigate between two vying planes. Then my father’s life intersected mine and I was so focused on giving that my life gelled into one.

On one plane, I have my ‘ill life’ which constitutes my ongoing battle with cancer. Replete with challenges it runs the gamut from medical to administrative. There are protocols that need to be continuously re-evaluated, weekly treatments, frequent blood tests, recurrent trips to the emergency room, and hospitalizations. There is endless paperwork, staying abreast of new medications, discussions with the hematologist, informational conferences.

On another, I have the life I love to live. This revolves around satisfyingly creative work, family, children, many grandchildren, and until recently, caring for my father.

Sometimes the planes are seamlessly balanced, other times, I am so out of balance, I feel I am falling off the precipice.

Last March my husband and I flew back to the States to help my 90-year old father pack and make aliyah.

For months my sister and I had been discussing the possibility of bringing my father to Israel. Until he was 90 years old, he worked full-time. But once the daily routine vanished, my father became restless. We felt that a change would be good, and since most of the grandchildren and all of the great-grandchildren were living in Israel, Israel seemed to offer an outstanding solution.

My father agreed. And, life began anew for him as he settled into an assisted living residence equidistant to the extended family. He took advantage of the diverse activities, discovered new interests and enjoyed frequent visits from family members.
I would visit twice-weekly on my way home from work, and on Fridays to wish him Shabbat Shalom.

I was amazed at how wonderfully he was adapting to being a new oleh, in a new city, in a new residence. I was equally amazed at how smoothly I was able to maintain the balance I had so carefully crafted since becoming ill four years ago. The situation seemed idyllic.

That is, until my father became ill and one hospitalization led to another. Now, instead of thrice-weekly visits to my father the visits were daily.

As my father’s health deteriorated, so did mine. And, as his life was thrown off balance, so was mine. So that by the time my father passed away in his hospital bed, I was in a hospital bed some 20 kilometers away.

We never fully realize how delicate that balance in life can be. As much as we would like to manage it, I learned that we cannot, nor should we want to. But, perhaps there is comfort in knowing that when one injects life with unbounded love and caring, one’s ‘ill life’ and the life one loves to live can seamlessly blend into one. As it should be.

Ilene Bloch-Levy was diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma in March 2012. She grew up in New York and made aliyah in 1986. She has 6 married children, and her husband has 3 married children. They both enormously enjoy a gaggle of grandchildren. A freelance copywriter, Ilene lives in the Shomron. According to her, “One of the joys of working in Israel is that Israelis get the important things in life; during my treatments and hospitalization, all of my clients patiently waited for me to return to work.”

[Editor’s note: We are grateful to Ilene for sharing some of her personal experiences with the SPP community, and are confident that her thoughts will help strengthen and enlighten the readers. Her views are her own and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Shira Pransky Project. If you would like to contribute to our blog with your own thoughts or experiences related to the Israeli healthcare system, let us know: info@shirapranskyproject.org.

Related

Mental Health Reform in Effect, as of July 1, 2015

The following update was contributed by Debbie Burack, a volunteer for The Shira Pransky Project. 

In May 2012 the Deputy Minister of Health, Rabbi Yaakov Litzman, signed a government order to establish the Mental Health Reform. Until that date, mental health services were not in the basket of services provided by the kupot cholim (HMOs), and were instead under the direct responsibilities of the Ministry of Health.

On July 1, 2015, this Mental Health Reform officially went into effect. Essentially, the kupot cholim now assume responsibility for all mental health services. This change demonstrates a progressive recognition of the integral connection between health of the body and health of the mind. It also helps to reduce any stigma attached to receiving treatment for mental health conditions.

Click here for general overview of the Mental Health Reform on the Ministry of Health website.

Highlights of the Mental Health Reform:

What?

  • In the same way that physical medical services are provided by your doctors on the kupot cholim, all mental health services are now provided or funded by the kupot cholim.
  • Founded on the judgment of clinical professionals, basic services include:
    • Psychiatric hospitalization services
    • Clinic based services, such as diagnosis, assessment, counseling, crisis intervention, personal, family or group treatment, follow-up and maintenance
    • Day treatment at a clinic

Who?

  • Regardless of age, any resident or citizen of Israel is entitled to receive these services, as per the recommendation of a medical professional. Treatment will be given in accordance with need.

  • If you have already been receiving mental health treatment, you should continue going to the same provider. Private information about your diagnosis and previous treatment will be transferred confidentially to your kupat cholim, with your permission. This is done in order to help your family physician achieve optimal outcomes when treating your total health.

How?

  • Information regarding how to seek and receive mental health treatment is provided by your respective kupat cholim. Either ask your family doctor, or call the moked (call center) of your kupat cholim. This process works the same way even with an individual who is currently in a rehabilitative framework.
  • In the event of mental distress that requires immediate care, you may go to a psychiatric emergency room at no charge, when your family physician or treatment provider is not available. Every mental health center has a 24 hour emergency room, and no referral is needed. You can also proceed to the emergency room of a general hospital, where psychiatric consultants are on duty. 

In order to implement quality control of the professional mental health services provided by the kupot cholim, supervision and monitoring will be conducted by the Mental Health Division of the Ministry of Health. If the kupat cholim is overburdened, there may be a wait period until treatment is received. However, the Ministry of Health plans to oversee that waiting times are reasonable.

Click here for Frequently Asked Questions about individual rights and specific mental conditions on the Ministry of Health website.

This update was contributed by a volunteer for The Shira Pransky Project. Debbie Burack moved to Israel twenty years ago and has been writing ever since. She writes on a wide array of subjects, with specialties in consumer health education and topics in art and design. For more info and to see her writing portfolio, contact: tothepointdrb@gmail.com.

Warning: High Levels of Methanol Found in Josephin- Bonaparte BRANDY XO and Vodka Moldova

poison

The Ministry of Health has issued a warning against the consumption of Josephin- Bonaparte BRANDY XO and Vodka Moldova, due to a methanol level that exceeds the permitted amount.

The Food Service in the Ministry of Health warns the public against the consumption of the alcoholic beverages pictured below, whose labels do not show the manufacturer’s/importer’s name and address:​

צילום של הבקבוקים

צילום של הבקבוקים

A methanol level that exceeds the permitted amount could cause blindness or even death. Methanol poisoning manifests as dizziness, confusion, weakness, headache, vomiting, abdominal pain and even convulsions.

For more information, contact the Ministry of Health’s Health Voice Call Center: *5400 or the Ministry of Health’s Division of Enforcement and Inspection: modin@eliav.health.gov.il, 02-6551797, 02-6551772.

 

This announcement was originally published on the Ministry of Health website. Click here to view the original press release.

 

Savoring the Moment

By Ilene Bloch-Levy

We are celebrating the birth of another grandson. Tomorrow, G’d willing, is his brit. We were supposed to spend Shabbat with the parents and our mechutanim helping with the two older children (3 years and 1-1/2 years old) and getting acquainted with this newest, blessed addition.

Unfortunately, my husband and I had to ‘gracefully decline’ as I was hospitalized shortly after the birth with a high fever and what turned out to be a ‘simple’ urinary tract infection. Although, I’ve learned that with multiple myeloma — cancer of the blood — very few health encounters are simple.

This is a second marriage for my husband and I. We were both widowed. When I met my husband he had three grown children, but only one — his youngest — was married. I had six grown children and no one was married. Since then, we’ve married off all the children and have been blessed with one birth after another. Sometimes people ask me how many grandchildren we have, and I avoid answering.

Recently, as I lay in the hospital battling this newest infection, I asked myself why I dislike answering this seemingly ordinary question. There are numerous superstitions about revealing the number of grandchildren one has, one of them being to avoid inviting the ‘evil eye.’ A friend recently told us that there’s an old Hebrew expression which roughly translates into “don’t count the cash while the register is still open.” I like that saying a lot, because a few months ago we celebrated one birth on my husband’s side and are expecting yet another one on my side any day now.

But it occurred to me that the reason I don’t talk about the number of grandchildren has nothing to do with notions of ‘evil eyes’ or ‘open cash registers’ but rather because of my illness.

When I was first diagnosed with multiple myeloma in March 2012 we were preparing for my oldest daughter’s wedding — the fifth of my children to get married. I had decided to delay induction therapy treatments until after her June wedding, as I was fearful that I might be too ill to stand beside her under the chupa. That was an unwise decision, as I ended up coughing my way through the whole evening and three days later was hospitalized with pneumonia. Most of what I remember from the wedding was grasping for air. And, instead of going on a honeymoon, the newly marrieds visited me in the hospital.

Numbers have a finiteness to them. But joy, celebration, gratitude — all of these feelings that I experience with my gorgeous, growing, healthy family, watching the young mothers nurse, the cousins deepening their friendships, our small and large family gatherings, participating in the achievements of these young children and their parents. These are moments of infiniteness. Each one to be savored. Each one impossible to count or measure. Now, as the multiple myeloma has relapsed, this infiniteness fills the spaces of my heart completely, staving off the fear.

Ilene Bloch-Levy was diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma in March 2012. She grew up in New York and made aliyah in 1986. She has 6 married children, and her husband has 3 married children. They both enormously enjoy a gaggle of grandchildren. A freelance copywriter, Ilene lives in the Shomron. According to her, “One of the joys of working in Israel is that Israelis get the important things in life; during my treatments and hospitalization, all of my clients patiently waited for me to return to work.”

[Editor’s note: We are grateful to Ilene for sharing some of her personal experiences with the SPP community, and are confident that her thoughts will help strengthen and enlighten the readers. Her views are her own and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Shira Pransky Project. If you would like to contribute to our blog with your own thoughts or experiences related to the Israeli healthcare system, let us know: info@shirapranskyproject.org.

Related

WARNING: Dangerous levels of methanol in questionable vodka and arak

Bottles of “Vodka Kremlin” and “Nasich HaArak” that were confiscated by police were tested by Misrad HaBriut and was found to have 523 – 533 times the legal amount of methanol in them.  The arak is suspected to be a forgery because of various misspellings such as the word “ערק” which is spelled “ארק” and the word “ממולא” which is spelled “ממלוא”.   

The permitted amount of methanol in vodka and arak according to Israeli Standard 1572 is 10 grams per 100 liters ethanol.

Drinking excessive amounts of methanol can lead to blindness and even death.  Methanol poisoning is expressed as dizziness, confusion, weakness, headaches, vomiting, stomachaches, and convulsions.

The Ministry of Health is calling on the public not to drink these products because they are a danger to public health.

If needed, you can report to the moked at *5400 or the Department of Enforcement in Misrad HaBriut at 02-6551797, 02-6551772 or email modin@eliav.health.gov.il.

20140907_091049_resized_1.jpg

Source: Misrad HaBriut

 
 
Thanks to Frugal Shopper on Janglo for the English!

Diabetics – Changes to Benefit Regulations

diabetes supplies

The regulations for diabetics submitting a claim for any of the following will change as of December 1, 2014:

  • General disability pension from the National Insurance Institute (Bituach Leumi) 
  • Work injury allowance  from the National Insurance Institute (Bituach Leumi) 
  • Income tax exemption request from the Tax Authority

 

For anyone submitting a claim to the National Insurance Institute (Bituach Leumi) after  December 1, 2014, the degree of medical disability will be established according to new regulations as detailed below:

 

For individuals with uncontrolled diabetes:

If you have additional complications, disability of at least 65% will be established if the severity of at least one complication is determined to be at a rate of at least 30% disability, or if you have at least two complications each of which has been determined to be at a rate of 20% disability.

If you do not have additional complications, have one complication determined to be at a rate of less than 30% or two complications each of which has been determined to be at a rate of less than 20%, the degree of medical disability will be determined according to the severity of the diabetes up to 50% medical disability (instead of 40% as it had been previously).

Please note: If you submit a claim before December 1, 2014 and the medical committee or medical appeals committee then meets between December 1, 2014 and December 1, 2017, your rate of disability will be determined according to either the new or old regulations, whichever is more beneficial to you.

For more details on these changes, contact the National Insurance Institute (Bituach Leumi) by calling *6050.

Click here to view the full regulations (in Hebrew).

 

Related information:

  

If this information was helpful to you, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:
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To your health ! לבריאות

RECALL – Zovirax eye ointment

ministry of health

According to a Ministry of Health announcement, Zovirax eye ointment from batches 4E915 (expiration 5.2019) and 4B909 (expiration 2.2019) has been recalled due to the suspected presence of solid particles in the ointment.

The Ministry of Health has ordered the manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) to remove the effected product from use.

Individuals using ointment from either of these batches should discontinue use immediately, go to their doctor for instructions and alternatives, and are requested to return the product to the pharmacy.

The complete Ministry of Health announcement in Hebrew can be found here.

RECALL – Fresenius Heparin anticoagulant

ministry of health

According to a Ministry of Health announcement, Fresenius has announced a recall of Heparin after particles were found in the product.

Please Note: Heparin is primarily used as an anticoagulant in hospitals and dialysis facilities. It is rarely used by individual patients at home. Individuals who self-inject Heparin at home must go to the nearest hospital to receive an alternative, while those who inject it subcutaneously or who use it as a catheter flush must contact their kupat cholim.

No reports have been received regarding any clinical issues arising due to this product defect.

The complete Ministry of Health announcement in Hebrew, along with pictures of the defective product can be found here.

New Employment Website for People with Disabilities

The Avoda Negisha website aims to help people with disabilities become integrated into the workforce. The website includes job listings intended for people with disabilities, information and tools to help them find employment, support for employers wishing to employ people with disabilities, and information for professionals in related fields. The initiative is a collaboration between JDC-Israel, various Israeli government offices and ministries and other non-governmental organizations.

avoda negisha

www.AvodaNegisha.org.il

 

Note: The website is currently only available in Hebrew, but there is a chat option that shows up in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen (look for the speech bubble and the words “שוחח איתנו”), and there is a call center: 03-6013222. If you have trouble understanding the Hebrew on the site, you can chat or call a representative who should then be able to help you in English, put you in touch with someone who can, or let you leave a message for an English-speaker. If you are still having trouble, let us know.

 

What’s on the site? 

  • Job Listings – The listings are browseable and searchable, users can register and make a profile to have suitable listings forwarded to them, and they can submit applications through the site.
  • Tools for Success – Help writing and reviewing resumes, a sample resume to look at, a guide for searching for and finding employment, various training courses and a listing of assistance organizations and professionals.
  • Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) – Visitors can browse previously asked questions or ask their own.
  • Career Magazine – Different articles and postings related to employment and training of people with disabilities.
  • Listing of service providers, a calendar of events, and more.

 

Related:

For more information related to individuals with disabilities, check out our All Rights Index (which is searchable and browseable), especially the People with Disabilities Portal and the Employment of People with Disabilities Portal.

 

If this information was helpful to you or someone you know, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:
Donate Now!

Tips for Healthy Fasting on Yom Kippur

Kapparot

The Ministry of Health has published the following tips for fasting on Yom Kippur:

On the day preceding Yom Kippur: it is recommended to eat several light meals and to drink plentiful amounts of water. It is recommended to restrict consumption of beverages that contain caffeine, such as tea, coffee, cola and energy drinks.

Seuda Mafseket (The meal immediately before the beginning of the fast)
  • This meal should preferably contain vegetable salad, cooked vegetables, a serving of protein such as chicken/meat, and a starch side dish (such as potatoes, rice and pasta – preferable whole grain). For dessert, it is possible to eat fruit or a slice of cake (an easy-to-prepare recommended recipe appears later).
  • Make sure to drink plentiful amounts of water before and after the meal, and not to drink beverages containing caffeine.
  • In order to avoid a sensation of thirst during Yom Kippur: it is very important that consumption of salt and salt-rich foods be kept low! It is desirable to restrict the seasoning of cooked dishes and salads with salt, soup powder and sauces, and to avoid serving pickles and salt-rich sauces at the meal.
 
The meal after breaking the fast
  • Immediately at the end of the fast, it is recommended to “break” the fast with a cup of water, a small date or other fruit, and clear vegetable soup.
  • Approximately half an hour later, a light meal can be eaten, containing vegetable salad, cooked vegetable, bread made from whole grain wheat and cheese with a fat content of up to 5%, or a light meat meal with lean meat.
  • It is recommended to resume eating gradually and moderately.

 

These recommendations were originally published on the Ministry of Health website. Click here to view the original page.

For their somewhat less useful and more comical recommendations for holiday eating, click here.

גמר חתימה טובה!

 

Ministry of Health Eating Recommendations for the Holiday Season

Translations like these are why we need The Shira Pransky Project!

Rosh Hashana table

The Ministry of Health has published recommendations for the holiday season, including some questionable (and sometimes comical) translations, like:

  • “Skipping meals can cause a reaction in which hunger is felt, a state that leads to devouring large amounts without being able to control this.”
  • “It is worthwhile to be wary of ‘tearing into’ large amounts of food.”
  • Some odd menu choices such as “​Pumpkin baked without oil” and “Green cowpea cooked without oil”.


While these translations get their point across and may be funny because the content is not that important, imagine if all of your critical healthcare information in English was translated in the same way! The Shira Pransky Project exists to provide quality information to Israel’s English-speakers so that they can better understand and navigate the Israeli healthcare system.

The Ministry’s complete recommendations appear below in their unedited form:

Recommendations for Rosh Hashana and this season’s Festivals

Rosh Hashana and the remaining festivals of this season allow us to enjoy splendid things such as being on holiday, family and excursions. However, alongside all of this is worry of the effects of disturbance to the normal daily routine and diet, and consequent worry about weight gain.
 
The many festive meals, rich in courses and calories, together with free time and hospitality, could lead to uncontrolled eating and to putting on several unwanted kilograms. It is reasonable to assume that it is not always only the type of food eaten that causes weight gain, but also the quantities consumed in this period.
 
During this period of Jewish festivals, it is recommended to adopt some basic behavioral rules that could assist you in maintaining wise dietary habits and avoiding weight gain and various digestive tract problems. Below are some useful tips:
 
Prior to and during the festivals, as well as throughout the year
  • It is recommended to eat proper meals and to avoid a situation in which one “forgets” to eat. Skipping meals can cause a reaction in which hunger is felt, a state that leads to devouring large amounts without being able to control this.
  • In states of excess fatigue, which are characteristic of many people in this period (mainly those who are hosting guests), the natural reaction is – over-eating. It is worthwhile to be wary of “tearing into” large amounts of food. It is recommended to take a break during preparations, drink water, and if you feel hungry, take a slice of whole bread, and spread it with a thin layer of something that you like. It is also possible to prepare a bowl of sliced vegetables or vegetable soup for “emergencies”.
  • It is worthwhile to increase physical activity and to get into an exercise routine that also continues during the period of the festivals. It is advisable during the period of preparations for the festivals to go on errands by foot or by bicycle.
 
Physical exercise close to home and on excursions in the bosom of nature
  • The period of the festivals is a good season for going out for a brief trip near home or for a family excursion in the bosom of nature.
  • It is worthwhile to set aside at least half an hour every day for enjoyable activity alone or with the family, and to prefer active recreation to going to a restaurant, e.g. walking, cycling, bowling, ball games, playing tag and excursions on foot. This habit can be internalized and also continued after the festivals!
  • During the festival period, it is worthwhile to discard the excuse “I don’t have time” and to make time also for planned physical exercise.
 
Caloric Values of some Festival Foods
 
​Food Unit​ Calories​
​Apple ​1 medium ​60
​Honey ​1 teaspoon ​20
​Dried dates ​2 small ​60
​Pomegranate seeds ​2 spoons ​25
​Gefilte fish ​1 fish ball ​155
​Pumpkin baked without oil ​Medium serving (serving spoon) ​50
​Grilled chicken thigh and drumstick without skin ​1 serving ​225
​Oven-baked peeled potato without oil ​​Medium serving (serving spoon) ​380
​Beef cooked in wine Medium slice ​240
​Mullet fish in tomato sauce – “chraime” Medium serving ​395
​Chopped liver 3 spoons ​95
​Fried leek cutlets ​​2 cutlets ​282
​Hummus salad ​4 spoons ​70
​Rice fried in canola oil ​Medium serving ​330
​Green cowpea cooked without oil ​Serving spoon ​120
​Lamb head ​50 grams – 2 small slices of meat ​157
​Head of mullet or trout fish ​50 grams ​70
​Quince baked in sugar ​​1 medium ​150
​Purchased honey cake ​Medium slice ​90
 
 

These recommendations were originally published on the Ministry of Health website. Click here to view the original page.

For information on healthy Yom Kippur fasting, click here.

 

If you now better understand the need for The Shira Pransky Project, please enable us to help others by supporting the project:
www.shirapranskyproject.org/donate/

The Ins and Outs of Elderly Patient Hospitalization

By Esther Parnes and Michal Naor

Mr. Schwartz’s Cough

Mr. Schwartz celebrated his 85th birthday in the department of internal medicine. It was his second hospitalization in the last month. He started coughing at the beginning of the winter and medical tests showed nothing. After a week’s hospitalization Mr. Schwartz was sent home, though he continued to cough and reduce his varied activities. 

Mr. Schwartz has been a pensioner for more than 10 years and his time is dedicated to his many hobbies: photography, crafts, hikes, driving and social gatherings. The CT scan done in the emergency room showed pulmonary embolism in both of his lungs. After another week of hospitalization, Mr. Schwartz went home with a selection of drugs: blood thinners and diuretics with the hope that now he would be able to return to his formerly active lifestyle. However the medicines didn’t help and his condition further deteriorated.

Although Mr. Schwartz was still able to walk on his own when he was admitted for his third hospitalization, after two days in the department of internal medicine he could no longer move his body or breathe independently and was transferred to intensive care. An ultrasound showed that there was serious damage to the right side of the heart, and the words “cardiac insufficiency” (aka heart failure) fell upon Mr. Schwartz, his wife, and his children, completely changing their lives.

Hospital routine

Cardiac insufficiency and other typical ailments of the elderly often require repeated hospitalizations, changing the daily routine of the spouse and other family members and necessitating a reorganization of family resources.

Despite the supportive medical care in the hospital, there is a physical and psychological “price” for the hospitalization. Being removed from the home and a familiar environment, dealing with the loss of various physical capabilities, and worrying what the future might bring can sometimes be the cause of confusion, loss of spirits, and even depression.

Here are some tips for handling these issues:

  1. Notify the medical staff about any changes in the psychological state of the patient in order to get proper treatment in this regard.
  2. It is important that the family be at the patient’s hospital bedside. Remember that the hospital staff with all its good will is understaffed and unable to attend to all of the patients’ needs. Without someone nearby the patient can feel helpless and requests for assistance may go unanswered.
  3. Dividing the burden among the family members can help the patient greatly. There is also the possibility of hiring nursing care for various times of day or night when family is unable to be available.
  4. It is advisable to bring along reading material, magazines, or a laptop computer in order to make the hospital stay more pleasant (but one should also take precautions to prevent possible theft of valuables). It is also possible to rent a television for the patient from hospital services.
  5. It is important to make contact with the social worker at the beginning of the hospitalization and utilize his/her services. Every department in the hospital has a social worker whose job is to assist the patient while he/she is hospitalized, and also to make certain arrangements upon his/her release.
  6. Make use of physical therapists and their services, which are available in many hospital departments to help patients regain their physical functioning, including breathing rehabilitation.

Support for the patient’s spouse

The life of the patient’s spouse is fraught with many ups and downs. His/her absence from the home and the frequent visits to the hospital often cause a decline in both physical and emotional states. Worry about the patient can sometimes cause the spouse to neglect his/her own health. In this area, too, the family needs to be on alert to the condition of the spouse.

Release from the hospital to rehabilitative care

Following hospitalization, some patients need continued medical supervision and rehabilitation. The social worker of the hospital department will suggest an appropriate care facility for the patient about to be released and will contact this facility.  Families that confer with relevant professionals, such as a gerontological consultant, receive more in depth information and assistance in proper decision making regarding the continued treatment of the patient. These care facilities are paid for by kupat cholim. The staff in these facilities include: doctors, nurses, social workers, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, and orderlies to help with patients’ needs.

Families whose loved one is to be released to rehabilitative care should note the following:

  • The family should act as soon as the hospital suggests continued treatment to facilitate the transfer to a suitable care facility. Due to lack of space in rehabilitative facilities in Israel, there is a waiting list.
  • It is important to note that the needs of the family (e.g. location of facility and accessibility) do not always match the criteria for the hospital staff recommending a facility.
  • Visit the facility in order to choose the one that is most appropriate.
  • Proper preparation on the part of the family of the patient and consulting with relevant professionals can ease the stress of the situation and may even be a deciding factor in the healing process.

Mr. Schwartz’s recovery 

Mr. Schwartz’s situation continued to improve as a result of the dedicated and professional care that he received in the hospital, and at the continuing care facility to which he was released. Upon arrival at home, special preparations were needed, details of which will be discussed in the next article.

Esther Parnes and Michal Naor are gerontological consultants. They can be reached by calling 054-765-6685 or 050-838-9490, or via the  אילת גיל הזהב Facebook page

Our strict contributed content guidelines ensure useful, informative and non-solicitous submitted content. Opinions expressed in this article are the authors’ own.

 

Related:

For related information check out our “Counseling Service for the Elderly from Bituach Leumi” and “Home Care from the Kupat Cholim” pages.

For more information on rights related to seniors, check out our All Rights Index (which is searchable and browseable), especially the Old Age and Aging Portal and Senior Health Portal.

Warning! Extremely High Levels of Methanol Found in Two Types of Vodka

poison

The Ministry of Health has issued a warning against the consumption of Vodka Alaska (suspected of being counterfeit) and Moscow Vodka, which were found to contain large amounts of methanol.

Testing by the Division of Enforcement and Inspection of the Ministry of Health performed upon vodka beverages seized by the Fraud Department of Tel Aviv Police has revealed that Vodka Alaska and Moscow Vodka contained methanol in extremely high amounts.

  • Vodka Alaska 99 ml – The methanol level was found to be 508 times higher than the requirements of the Israeli standard. This beverage is also suspected of being counterfeit due to incorrect labelling of the product (spelling errors and incorrect Rabbinate listing).
  • Moscow Vodka – The methanol level was found to be 474 times higher that the requirements of the Israeli standard. 


The methanol content requirement is 10 g per 100 liters of ethanol, as per Israeli Standard 1572.

Methanol at high doses could cause side effects manifesting as dizziness, weakness, confusion, headaches, vomiting, abdominal pain and convulsions. Drinking methanol could cause blindness as a result of damage to the optic nerve, and even death.

For more information, contact the Ministry of Health’s Health Voice Call Center: *5400 or the Ministry of Health’s Division of Enforcement and Inspection: modin@eliav.health.gov.il, 02-6551797, 02-6551772.

 

This announcement was originally published on the Ministry of Health website. Click here to view the original press release.

 

Parents of children with ATRX or 18Q22.3 chromosomal disorder wanted

Parents of children with the following conditions are wanted to provide support and information to others:

  • ATRX – Alpha-Thalassemia X-Linked Intellectual Disability Syndrome (a genetic disorder)
  • 18Q22.3 (a chromosomal disorder)

 

If you or someone you know are dealing with either of these conditions, you can make a major difference in someone else’s life. A few minutes of your time can help another family make it through.

If you can help, please contact Golda from the Beineinu organization: Golda@Beineinu.org.

Click here to learn more about the Beinenu organization in our Organizations Directory.

Check out our Guide for Children with Special Needs, as well as our All Rights Index (which is both searchable and browseable) for information on rights, services and entitlements.